Hose Company No. 3

Jessica Reske

Hose Co. No. 3 was constructed in 1894 to house horses and horse-drawn fire-fighting apparatus.  The building was designed by John F. Bishop, a prominent Pueblo architect.   Constructed of brick and stone masonry, the building was designed in the 19th century commercial style, and includes elements of the Italianate style.  The front (northwest facade) is faced with grey sandstone while the side and rear facades are constructed of multi-wythe brick masonry.  At the rear of the building, a hose tower rises an additional story past the roof line of the two-story building.  The entire building was painted sometime prior to the 1960s based on available photographs of the building.

When constructed, the interior of the building was designed to accommodate one horse-cart, two stalls for horses, and the hose tower drain on the first floor.  The second floor included a sleeping room, sitting room with lockers, bathroom, and feed room with hay and a feed box for grain.  The feed room was converted to a kitchen in 1915 when the fire department ended the era of horse-drawn equipment.

The building actively used by the Pueblo Fire Department until 1979.  From 1979 to 1989, the fire department used the building for storage.  In 1989, the Pueblo Fire Museum first opened in the building.  The Museum operated until 1992, when it was closed for several years.  Following inventory of the collection, the Museum was re-opened and remains in use as the Pueblo Fire Museum.  The building is one of the oldest in Pueblo and is a City of Pueblo Historical Landmark.

Form+Works Design Group is working with Hord Coplan Macht to produce construction documents for the rehabilitation of the exterior of the building.  In addition, critical repair work will be completed this summer to re-anchor loose sandstone and remove failing stone on the front facade of the building.

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For additional information about the history of the building and the Museum please visit http://www.hosecono3.com
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